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Nairobi
April 10, 2024
News Water Management and Technology

Ministry of Water aims to address water scarcity

The ministry remains open to adopting new technologies that facilitate better service delivery to the public. Dr. Ronoh affirms that if improved dam designs, pipelines, or management systems emerge during the planning of water infrastructure, they will be embraced willingly.

The Ministry of Water, Sanitation, and Irrigation is actively promoting the use of Water Magnetic Flow Meters as a means to combat water shortages. Dr. Paul Ronoh, the Principal Secretary of the State Department for Water and Sanitation, emphasizes the effectiveness of this technology in monitoring the flow of water from its source to its destination. By employing Magnetic Meter technology, it becomes easier to identify pipe leakages, which in turn helps prevent the unnecessary loss of public funds.

Dr. Ronoh stated that a recent conference was held to discuss the application of technology in delivering water services efficiently and effectively to the public. The ministry’s goal is to ensure comprehensive management of water, including monitoring consumption at the household level.

Despite significant investments made by the government in dam construction and water infrastructure to increase water supply nationwide, poor water management has hindered progress. Dr. Ronoh emphasizes the critical role of water management within the overall water deployment ecosystem. Therefore, the ministry advocates for the use of technology to enhance water management practices.

The ministry remains open to adopting new technologies that facilitate better service delivery to the public. Dr. Ronoh affirms that if improved dam designs, pipelines, or management systems emerge during the planning of water infrastructure, they will be embraced willingly.

Technology implementation is not limited to water management alone but also extends to the construction of sewerage systems. The ministry intends to utilize compartmental sewerage systems, which involve the use of containers instead of conventional systems. This approach offers benefits such as flexibility in accommodating population growth, ease of deployment, and reduced land costs.

Dr. Ronoh stresses the inevitability of embracing technology as the world faces an impending water crisis, evident from the decreasing international per capita water consumption rate. The recommended per capita water consumption stands at 1000 cubic meters per year. However, the figures show a decline over the years, with a projected decrease to a concerning 206 cubic meters next year. This trend indicates the drying up of water bodies, highlighting the urgent need for action to avert a global crisis.

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